Ludum Dare 30 – Day 5

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We asked for a list of Ludum Dare 30 games to check out and you delivered. Now John is taking an hour each day to play through this stack of awesome games about connected worlds! Day five includes the games Song of Elements, Capsule, The Salt Pleeease, and WE MUST EXPLORE

 

Song of Elements

Song of Elements – @saschanarr

A Twine game about dueling universes. One is that of fire and the other of water. You go through the game making choices and discover how these realms are connected. Will you strike the balance necessary or watch both worlds crumble. This was a nice little game, I felt it gave the user the ability to circle back to see all the choices, which I think hurt the experience. There is something compelling about making choices and going down a path without the ability to second guess yourself. I wish this game did more of that.

Capsule

Capsule – @paperblurt

This may be one of my favorite games of the batch. Capsule is another twine game where you are the last of 12 navigators tasked to steward a spaceship alone for 8 years at a time, while everyone else is in cryo-stasis. The game discusses what that would be like, and what things we would prepare for such a job. There is also quite a bit of design treatment for a test based game which I thought was quite awesome. Only bummer was that the game bugged out on me near the end for using forward/back buttons for browsing.

 

Pass the Salt

The Salt Pleeease – ponk

Pass condiments around a table by using your all the hands on the table. First off, I love the illustration style, reminds me of those classic Scholastic magazines you would get in grade school. The the mechanic itself is quite interesting, so the mouse is tied to its normal x/y axis but all the arms follow with it. This felt like it really found a great interpretation of what ‘connected worlds’ can mean.

 

We Must Explore

WE MUST EXPLORE – @mattkrystek

This one had a interesting concept but its execution wasn’t the best. The goal is to move around and connect small pieces of space rock until you have enough of them tethered around you. Once you gather the right amount you can generate a new planet. However it didn’t quite communicate how many pieces you needed or what it took to convert red un-tether-able rocks to grey tether-able rock. The hit boxes also proved to be an issue for me, since I couldn’t control how my tethered rocks were moving around me, navigating narrow passages to get more rocks shrouded by larger red rocks always resulted in sadness. I liked the concept, but it could use quite a bit of work in communicating its ideas more succinctly.